• Pelee attracts about 300,000 visitors each year, largely because it is world famous for its bird and butterfly migrations.
  • Pelee is renowned as the best location in inland North America to observe the northward migration of songbirds.
  • Point Pelee National Park is considered one of the Top 10 Birding spots in North America.
  • Pelee has attracted over 380 species of birds during its spring and autumn migrations.
  • At the 850-acre Hillman Marsh, with 5 km of walking trails, Bald Eagles reside there along with many species of songbirds, herons, ducks, gulls, shorebirds, swallows, egrets, terns, ibises and loons.
  • Pelee has been coined “The Warbler Capital of Canada”—42 out of 50 warblers have been recorded here and 36 are seen here each spring. Including the Bay-breasted, Black-throated Blue, Blackpoll, Blackburnian, Canada, Cape May, Cerulean, Chestnut-sided, Connecticut, Eastern Kingbird, Golden-winged, Magnolia, Mourning, Orange-crowned, Prothonotary, Tennessee and Wilson’s.
  • An estimated 100,000 raptors migrate through the region each autumn, including the Peregrine Falcon, Cooper’s Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, Osprey, Turkey Vulture, Black Vulture, Bald Eagle and Golden Eagle.
  • Pelee has seven species of owls, including Northern Saw-whet, Eastern Screech and Long-eared owls.
  • Monarch butterflies have the longest and largest insect migration in North America—from Mexico to Canada—traveling up to 8,000 km rountrip per year. (Source: National Geographic)
  • The monarch migration here occurs each year from August to October. At its peak, for a few magnificent days each fall, as many as 10,000 monarch butterflies might land on Point Pelee in a single day.
  • Over 60 species of butterflies have been seen here over the last century. Including the Giant Swallowtail, a beautiful butterfly of impressive size that is common here, although rare in other parts of Canada.
  • Point Pelee is an 11-mile-long peninsula that extends to a sharp point into Lake Erie. There are 22.5 km (14 miles) of sand and pebble beaches, a mile long boardwalk and nature trails.
  • Pelee has more rare and endangered plants and animals than anywhere in Canada. It is a nature lover’s paradise with over 700 species of plant life.
  • Pelee, with its lush Carolinian forest, has over 70 species of trees. The Carolinian Forest is named because it shares much of the same flora and fauna found as far south as the Carolinas in the United States.
  • There are 27 species of reptiles and 20 species of amphibians, more than anywhere else in Canada.
  • Point Pelee National Park’s 20-square-kilometer (8-square-mile) landscape is a patchwork of ecosystems that includes marshes, forests, fields, and beaches, producing a complexity of life that is unequalled, even in Canada’s larger National Parks.